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If You Learn To Code You’ll Be A God Among Businessmen

Photo courtesy of Marjan Krebelj via Flickr and Matthew Bowden via Wikimedia. Modifications by Curiousmatic.

Want to learn a new language? Coding might be the one for you. Here’s why coding is a such desirable skill to have, and why programming is an increasingly important part of the business world.

Anyone can use a computer, and in this day and age, most people do. Babies are familiarized with iPads, and your grandmother uses Facebook with confidence.

Even so, the number of people able to program computers are few, and it’s becoming an extremely useful skill that limited people have been taught — one that is more and more necessary in business, and for which there is currently a huge job market.

Think your job might be replaced by a machine? Not if you can build a machine. Have a great business idea, but no idea how to execute it? Learn to code, and you are pretty much a superhero. You don’t depend on the machine — you understand it, and make it work for you.

As important as Rosetta Stone might be in teaching Spanish to an increasingly bilingual America, coding is still the real language of the future. As businesses becomes more and more digital, code-literacy is both practical and helpful for all parties. Hey, it may even get you a raise.

Why code?

Here are some interesting statistics, from code.org:

  • Computer Science is the highest paid college degree, with jobs growing at 2 times the national average.

  • Less than 2.2% of students graduate with a Computer Science degree. At our current rate, by 2020 there will be 1 million more jobs than students.

  • 9 out of 10 schools do not offer computer programming classes.

These figures are troubling because the high demand for coders is not currently being met. This is even more of a reason that coding is something worth learning, not just because it’s where the money is, but because it’s where business in general is heading.

Code for business, or at least know the basics.

Often, computer programmers work with businesses to implement their ideas, for which communication is key. Speaking the same language enables communication between coder and business owner, so that execution is at it’s smoothest, and the team is without language barrier.  If you’re a business owner and you know how to code, you can even program yourself, and save the expense of hiring an expert.

In terms of different coding languages, the most in demand as of 2013 is PHP, closely followed by Java, according to Jobs Tractor Language Trends. According to analysys by SitePoint.com, however the demand for PHP and Java is in decline, while JavaScript, Android IoS, and Ruby are on the rise.

How can I learn to code?

There are two options for learning to code: Get a formal degree either online or at a university (with an average duration of 3 years), or self educate.

Getting a degree will give you a well-rounded education, and also allow you to network with other programmers, as well as provide you with a structured schedule with deadlines. But like any other type of formal education, it can also be extremely expensive.

In contrast, self-education has an average price of $30 per month for tutorial websites. Some, such as CodeAcademy, are even free. Another great website is Treehouse, which provides a number of code-related courses for those who want to learn online.

All in all, it’s a language worth getting acquainted with. If you want to become a computer god or goddess among men, now is your chance.

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Jennifer Markert