weddingtrends

Shadows, Robots, And Hand Lifts: Seven Ridiculous And Expensive Wedding Trends

Weddings are fun, celebratory, and monumental occasions, made sweeter with cake, dancing, and overflowing amounts of free booze. But sometimes, truly odd and expensive wedding trends pop out of the blue. 

Here are seven wedding trends that might leave you scratching your head.

1. Shadow Weddings

In name alone, you might guess that a shadow wedding is a ceremony performed by shadow puppets, or one in which the regular wedding is just for show and a smaller more shadowy marriage occurs elsewhere.

Those are strange ideas, but the actual meaning is even weirder: a shadow wedding is a pre-wedding event in which, instead of making declarations of love and promises, the bride and groom express their dark sides and ceremonially fight out their issues in sweatpants instead of formalwear.

Cost: $2500 to $7500

2. Boudoir Books

Apparently, more brides-to-be are stripping down before the wedding night–for the groom, sure, but by way of the camera? The idea is to present as a gift to the groom a professionally shot erotic but tasteful “boudoir book” that specialists say is a form of self-expression and intimacy.

Cost: $500 – $1000

3. Not Invited Alerts

It’s awkward to let acquaintances know they didn’t make the invite list to the “happiest day of your life.” But typically, the absence of an invitation is a hint that reasonable people can take, and (usually) not take personally.

Lately, a trend of alerting those who didn’t make the cut has been growing, and understandably drawing criticism. Some have received them by mail, others by email, or even via the wedding planner.

Cost: Unnecessary drama

4. Plugged/unplugged weddings

Many couples choose to expand their receptions outside the physical, flower-clad realm of physicality and into the ethereal world of social media. For example, #JimAndJanWed might be made an official hashtag for the evening, which guests would be encouraged to use when tweeting or Instagramming the event.

This comes in contrast to the unplugged trend, which flat-out bans cell phone usage during a wedding and/or reception.

The former trend can be a bother in that it puts the onus on guests to take pictures, sometimes in lieu of a hired photographer, and the latter can be equally uncomfortable for guests with “criminal” urges to check their email or make a phone call once in a while.

For the wealthy, there’s another option: just hire a “Social Media Concierge” to live tweet, tag, and photograph the wedding.

Cost: $3,000

5. Social Media Prenup

Speaking of social media, we might as well pile this trend on. The social media prenup is a premarital contract that dictates what the couple can or cannot post on social media regarding one another.

Consequences of violations are often monetary, with the amount based on the offending party’s wealth.

Cost: You choose. According to ABC News, one couple set their penalties at $500,000 per clause.

6. Hand lifts for ring selfies

Oh brother. Brides who love their rings but are perhaps insecure due to outrageous finger beauty standards and the media’s objectification of hands have been fixing these horrible issues (veins! wrinkles! bones!) by getting botox in their hands.

That’s right. Botox for hands. Apparently, the sale of “hand lifts” has risen 40% since the rise of social media.

Cost: Over $1,000

7. Robots Helpers

Why use a living priest or photographer at your wedding, when robots could perform both duties? This would leave you less mouths to feed and entertain, and be more symbolic of your leap into the future.

Lucky for you, drone photographers and robot priests exist and will likely become more common in the future. Perhaps couples will say I R2D2 instead of I do?

Cost: $300-$400 for a 30 minute drone shoot. The Robot priest, called the i-Fairy, is unsurprisingly only available in Japan and currently costs about $70,000 to purchase.

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Jennifer Markert